Where are the Gaddafis?

by Omar Shtewi

Gaddafi meets Nicholas Sarkozy, who would later lead the effort to overthrow him

The situation in Libya following the collapse of the Gaddafi regime was bound to be very complex indeed.

The Gaddafis were involved with many important individuals outside Libya, in the course of their carving up of the natural resources of the country.  The tip of the iceberg of the Gaddafi’s involvement with foreign elites can be seen here, here, here, here, here and here.

Hilary Clinton meets Gaddafi's blood-soaked son El Mutassim, head of the Libyan security services. She would later demand, with other friends of the Gaddafi family, that they step down.

It is no secret that Blair met often with Muammar el Gaddafi and that Saif el Islam – Gaddafi’s heir-apparent – had met with Peter Mandelson at the Rothschild Villa in Corfu.  There are, of course, many other ways in which the Gaddafis leveraged Libya’s resources in exchange for personal gain and the perpetuation of their rule over Libya.

Following his Premiership, Blair acted on behalf of BP to secure their access to Libya's oil reserves. He was later present at the signing of the contract.

This is the context in which the apprehension – or supposed apprehension – of the Gaddafi princes becomes very complex.

Prince Andrew meets Gaddafi's nephew, Omar Massoud.

There may well be forces who would rather see the Gaddafis dead, than allow them to testify before a Libyan court as to their activities and alliances over the past 42 years.

Seif el Islam, butcher and thief, was heavily involved with the London School of Economics. He 'studied' governance (of all things) there and cheated to obtain his PhD. LSE let it go. He is a good friend of David Held, who facilitated the transfer of money stolen from Libya, by the Gaddafis, to LSE.

Have the Gaddafis been detained?

Initial reports stated that three of the Gaddafi children had been detained – Seif el Islam, Muhammad and Sa’adi.

We are yet to see any evidence, however, of this detention.  The Libyans surely deserve to see Seif el Islam in the custody of their compatriots.  Oddly, this has not happened.

The Guardian reports that Seif el Islam has been seen outside the Rixos Hotel in Tripoli.

I can say however, that I have it from a source in Libya that Seif el Islam has been seen walking – seemingly freely – into the Bab el Aziziyeh compound in Tripoli, which is supposed to be the scene of fierce fighting as we speak.

Al Jazeera reports, courtesy of AFP, that

Muammar Gaddafi’s son Saif al-Islam, wanted by the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity, has not been arrested by rebels despite earlier reports and is still in Tripoli, an AFP journalist said Tuesday.

Several journalists, including an AFP correspondent, saw Saif al-Islam in Muammar Gaddafi’s residential complex in the capital. ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo had earlier said the 39-year-old was arrested and in detention.

What is going on?  Could it be that the TNC did indeed capture Seif el Islam but have been forced by an outside interest to let him return to his family at Bab el Aziziyeh?  If so, why?

I can only assume that it is with a view to executing the entire Gaddafi family inside the complex and to deprive the Libyan people of the answers that they deserve.

  • What has been going on for the past 42 years?
  • Have foreigners been involved in the oppression of the Libyan people?
  • Where have the hundreds of billions of dollars in oil revenue stolen by the Gaddafi family been hidden?
  • To what extent were foreign corporations and politicians involved in the pillaging of Libya and the theft of its resources?

These are questions to which the Libyan people deserve answers.

They are also questions, however, which could result in a scandal that could undermine the altruistic pontificating that has characterised the NATO involvement in the Libyan uprising.

Could it be that, far from wanting to protect civilians, NATO in fact intervened so as the control the collapse of the Gaddafi regime and to hide the truth about the past 42 sordid years of Gaddafi rule?

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